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The Hysteria of Bodalís + The Return of the Operator

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Where did King Tut’s dagger come from?

March 15, 2022

Archaeologists found an iron dagger in King Tut’s tomb, one of many treasures unearthed decades ago.

The problem? The Iron Age hadn’t started. So, where did the dagger’s iron come from?

Meteorites.

After researchers discovered the iron’s source, they determined the likely production method by performing an x-ray analysis. But tracing where the dagger was made took a bit more detective work.

A series of stone tablets over 3,400 years old called the Amarna letters might offer an answer. They talk about an iron dagger given to King Tut by a king in Anatolia (think: Turkey) as a wedding present when marrying the Anatolian King’s daughter.

Turning this into a story, what if an Anatolian prince goes on a quest to get the dagger back from Egypt?

The story starts with the King of Mitanni (a region in Anatolia) on his deathbed. The prince is at his side, keeping him company.

Suddenly, the King’s brother storms the capital city and the royal palace, laying claim to the throne. The only way ruling elites will accept the prince’s claim to the throne is if it’s decreed from the heavens above—the prince must have the dagger made from a meteorite.

So, he starts on a quest, heading to Egypt. His initial plan is to simply ask for the dagger back, trade for it, or promise future gifts once he regains his throne. Along the way, he performs various side quests, similar to the video game Assassin’s Creed.

His prestige increases as he helps more people when he gets closer to Egypt. One wealthy landowner even sponsors his claim, giving him a stone tablet that he can present to King Tut that details the prince’s help.

A powerful horse thief that the prince stopped earlier on his journey intercepts the prince outside of Egypt, and the prince has to fight through the ranks until he can kill the thief and enter Egypt.

He gets an audience with King Tut and asks for the dagger. King Tut’s advisors tell the King not to hand over the dagger, but the King, grateful that the prince helped rid his lands of the powerful thief, agrees to trade a decade of service as a royal guard for the dagger. Afterward, King Tut will send forces with the prince to regain the throne in his distant homeland.

Other books would highlight the battle against ancient Egyptian enemies, such as priests and warlords, until the final book, when the prince regains his throne.

Recent Posts from Latin American author Marcos Antonio Hernandez

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